By 2020, at the latest, the mobilization of financial resources for effectively implementing the Strategic Plan for Biodiversity 2011-2020 from all sources and in accordance with the consolidated and agreed process in the Strategy for Resource Mobilization should increase substantially from the current levels. This target will be subject to changes contingent to resources needs assessments to be developed and reported by Parties.

Integrated Biodiversity Assessment Tool (IBAT)

IBAT offers a ‘one-stop shop’ data search service for those seeking authoritative global biodiversity information. Described by our users as “a must for any project on biodiversity conservation”, IBAT provides fast, easy, and integrated acces to three of the world’s most authoritative global biodiversity datasets: the IUCN Red List of Threatened Species, the World Database of Key Biodiversity Areas and the World Database on Protected Areas.

System of Environmental-Economic Accounting

The System of Environmental-Economic Accounting (SEEA) provides a framework for measuring the links between the environment and economy.

The SEEA consists of two parts. The SEEA Central Framework (SEEA CF) was adopted by the UN Statistical Commission as the first international standard for environmental-economic accounting in 2012. The Central Framework looks at individual environmental assets, such as water, forests and fisheries resources, and how they are extracted from the environment, used within the economy, and returned to the environment as air, water, and waste.

A Safe Operating Space for inland recreational fisheries

This publication applies the “Safe Operating Space” or SOS framework to inland recreational fisheries management by determining the parameters under which harvest, habitat, predation, catchability, and other qualities of a fishery are sustainable. The publication examines these key qualities and the interactions between them, and offers suggestions for managers to adjust the framework and make decisions appropriate to the unique situation of each fishery.

A review of coastal management approaches to support the integration of ecological and human community planning for climate change

This review describes the use of natural infrastructure in tidal marsh, beach and barrier island, mangrove, and biogenic reef habitats along the Atlantic, Gulf of Mexico, and Caribbean coasts of the United States. The term natural infrastructure refers to planned networks of natural lands that conserve or enhance ecosystem values and services (see Ozment et al., 2015). The benefits, opportunities, and challenges of implementing natural infrastructure in a coastal zone are compared to those of grey and hybrid infrastructure.