By 2020, knowledge, the science base and technologies relating to biodiversity, its values, functioning, status and trends, and the consequences of its loss, are improved, widely shared and transferred, and applied.

Ecosystem resilience to disruptions linked to global climate change: An adaptive approach to federal land management

This article summarizes the potential impacts of climate change on natural lands and resources to inform ten recommendations on promoting ecosystem resilience through adaptive management. The author argues that existing laws and policies are not sufficient to adequately address the risk of climate change, and land management statues should be altered to better reflect the current state of the environment.

Protocol and Best Practice for the Research on and Public Distribution of Information from Projects Involving Indigenous Peoples

This protocol establishes a general and widely-applicable set of principles and recommendations for federal- or state-funded researchers to positively communicate and collaborate with federally recognized American Indian tribes. The protocol’s non-linear set of initiatives includes consideration of the ethics and legality of obtaining permission to conduct research, collaboration with the host community, seeing from the perspective of the host community, and reciprocity and “giving back” to the community.

Challenges and successes in engaging citizen scientists to observe snow cover: from public engagement to an educational collaboration

This resource evaluates different strategies for using citizen science to collect observational data on snow disappearance in the Pacific Northwest. The most successful strategy was found to be a collaborative education campaign, which met the project’s dual goals of generating useful data for a study on the influence of forest cover on snow disappearance timing, and acting as an effective public engagement tactic.

A physical framework for evaluating net effects of wet meadow restoration on late-summer streamflow

This resource evaluates the efficacy of wet meadow restoration techniques in supporting the recovery of the unique yet fragile montane ecosystems and ensuring the continuation of their valuable aquatic and terrestrial ecosystem services. The physically-based conceptual groundwater model introduced in this resource informs managers of the possible consequences of certain restoration decisions and allows them to make choices that maximize benefits.

Integrated Biodiversity Assessment Tool (IBAT)

IBAT offers a ‘one-stop shop’ data search service for those seeking authoritative global biodiversity information. Described by our users as “a must for any project on biodiversity conservation”, IBAT provides fast, easy, and integrated acces to three of the world’s most authoritative global biodiversity datasets: the IUCN Red List of Threatened Species, the World Database of Key Biodiversity Areas and the World Database on Protected Areas.

System of Environmental-Economic Accounting

The System of Environmental-Economic Accounting (SEEA) provides a framework for measuring the links between the environment and economy.

The SEEA consists of two parts. The SEEA Central Framework (SEEA CF) was adopted by the UN Statistical Commission as the first international standard for environmental-economic accounting in 2012. The Central Framework looks at individual environmental assets, such as water, forests and fisheries resources, and how they are extracted from the environment, used within the economy, and returned to the environment as air, water, and waste.

A linked land-sea modeling framework to inform ridge-to-reef management in high oceanic islands

This linked land-sea modeling framework helps assess the relative influence of terrestrial and marine drivers on coral reef communities. It links land cover/use to coral reefs through analyzing nutrient-enriched groundwater flux. Based on climate, groundwater recharge and recharge nutrient concentration data, groundwater flow and nutrient flux discharging at the coast are modeled. The model was developed for two ahupua’a, or traditional ridge-to-reef management systems, in Hawaii.