By 2020, ecosystem resilience and the contribution of biodiversity to carbon stocks have been enhanced, through conservation and restoration, including restoration of at least 15 per cent of degraded ecosystems, thereby contributing to climate change mitigation and adaptation and to combating desertification.

Global change and conservation triage on National Wildlife Refuges

This resource discusses the role of “conservation triage”, a framework concerned with the allocation of scarce resources to maximize conservation effectiveness, in making decisions complicated by ecological and social values, climate change, and other management issues on United States National Wildlife Refuges (NWRs). The resource uses data derived from meetings and workshops with management professionals on coastal NWRs to examine professional perspectives and opportunities for improvement in scientific decision-making using social science techniques.

Ecosystem resilience to disruptions linked to global climate change: An adaptive approach to federal land management

This article summarizes the potential impacts of climate change on natural lands and resources to inform ten recommendations on promoting ecosystem resilience through adaptive management. The author argues that existing laws and policies are not sufficient to adequately address the risk of climate change, and land management statues should be altered to better reflect the current state of the environment.

Challenges and successes in engaging citizen scientists to observe snow cover: from public engagement to an educational collaboration

This resource evaluates different strategies for using citizen science to collect observational data on snow disappearance in the Pacific Northwest. The most successful strategy was found to be a collaborative education campaign, which met the project’s dual goals of generating useful data for a study on the influence of forest cover on snow disappearance timing, and acting as an effective public engagement tactic.

A physical framework for evaluating net effects of wet meadow restoration on late-summer streamflow

This resource evaluates the efficacy of wet meadow restoration techniques in supporting the recovery of the unique yet fragile montane ecosystems and ensuring the continuation of their valuable aquatic and terrestrial ecosystem services. The physically-based conceptual groundwater model introduced in this resource informs managers of the possible consequences of certain restoration decisions and allows them to make choices that maximize benefits.