By 2020 the extinction of known threatened species has been prevented and their conservation status, particularly of those most in decline, has been improved and sustained.

Informing Strategic Efforts to Expand and Connect Protected Areas Using a Model of Ecological Flow, with Application to the Western United States

This resource models current ecological linkages and terrestrial movement patterns to identify public yet unprotected lands in the western United States which may have high ecological value and strong connectivity with existing protected areas.

A physical framework for evaluating net effects of wet meadow restoration on late-summer streamflow

This resource evaluates the efficacy of wet meadow restoration techniques in supporting the recovery of the unique yet fragile montane ecosystems and ensuring the continuation of their valuable aquatic and terrestrial ecosystem services. The physically-based conceptual groundwater model introduced in this resource informs managers of the possible consequences of certain restoration decisions and allows them to make choices that maximize benefits.

Integrated Biodiversity Assessment Tool (IBAT)

IBAT offers a ‘one-stop shop’ data search service for those seeking authoritative global biodiversity information. Described by our users as “a must for any project on biodiversity conservation”, IBAT provides fast, easy, and integrated acces to three of the world’s most authoritative global biodiversity datasets: the IUCN Red List of Threatened Species, the World Database of Key Biodiversity Areas and the World Database on Protected Areas.

System of Environmental-Economic Accounting

The System of Environmental-Economic Accounting (SEEA) provides a framework for measuring the links between the environment and economy.

The SEEA consists of two parts. The SEEA Central Framework (SEEA CF) was adopted by the UN Statistical Commission as the first international standard for environmental-economic accounting in 2012. The Central Framework looks at individual environmental assets, such as water, forests and fisheries resources, and how they are extracted from the environment, used within the economy, and returned to the environment as air, water, and waste.